Tag Archives: Digital

Cfps__Theme Calls_Valuation Studies

[Dos nuevos llamados a contribur en Valuation Studies]

In 2020, Valuation Studies initiated a new phase. As the editorial ‘Towards a Reformulation’ explains in more detail, we call this new phase valuation as a problem. The overall aim of this new phase is to strengthen Valuation Studies as a platform for curated academic conversations on valuation. In order to achieve this goal, we have introduced an important shift in how we manage submissions. New submissions will need to be in relation to an open Theme Call. The purpose of this change is to foster a more focused discussion around particular issues of valuation.

Theme Calls are curated by the journal’s editorial board and guest editors. The process to contribute to Theme Calls has two steps. First, authors are invited to formally manifest interest in the call by submitting an extended abstract (maximum 1000 words). The abstract will be evaluated by the editors of the Theme. Second, papers resulting from accepted proposals will then undergo an anonymous peer-review process. Depending on the submissions and accepted papers, Theme Calls will become special sections, an issue or several issues in Valuation Studies. There are two Theme Calls currently open.

Theme call 1: Valuation as a semiotic, narrative, and dramaturgical problem: re-opening the toolbox of valuation studies. Editors: Fabian Muniesa (Mines ParisTech), José Ossandón (Copenhagen Business School) (more information about the call here).

Theme call 2: Digitizing Valuation. Editors: Francis Lee (Chalmers University of Technology), Andrea Mennicken (London School of Economics), Jacob Reilley (Helmut Schmidt University Hamburg), Malte Ziewitz (Cornell University) (more information about the call here).

 

Consumer databases as practical accomplishments

[Nuevo artículo de Tomás Ariztía en Journal of Cultural Economy, ‘Consumer databases as practical accomplishments: the making of digital objects in three movements’]

‘Consumer databases as practical accomplishments: the making of digital objects in three movements’

Tomas Ariztia

Abstract

This paper aims to reflect on some key issues linked to the production of digital objects in business settings. In doing so, it problematizes current social science scholarship, which emphasizes the analysis of digital data and analytics, and reinforces the magnitude of its consequences and ‘data power’. The paper proposes making three corrective ‘movements’ that might enrich our approaches to how databases and analytics are assembled in business settings. The first movement involves the problem of ethnographic access to data-making practices. We propose taking seriously the issue of fabricating an ethnographic encounter where the process of making digital objects is exposed. The second movement concerns the visibility and the type of politics taking place in data practices. We argue for the need to displace attention from data impacts and results to the myriad of mundane practices and devices through which these objects are assembled. The third movement we suggest requires a focus on examining error and failure as key aspects of the manufacturing of consumer databases. Each of these movements is illustrated by ethnographic vignettes from a 9-month ethnographic experiment that involved participating in the first stages of the manufacturing of an online financial retail company’s consumer database. Continue reading